Common Questions From New Runners

As a coaches we get quite a few training questions from new and experienced runners alike, but some questions we get more often than others, so Alicia and I have picked seven common questions we get regularly and answered them below. We hope this helps you in your journey to awesomeness!

  1. How important is my pace?

It’s not important! Well, let me rephrase that: how fast you’re going is not important when you’re a new runner. When you’re first starting out most, if not ALL, of your runs should be at an easy pace. Very easy. That pace will vary each day based on how you’re feeling which is impacted not only by training, but personal and work life/stress as well. Don’t get caught up in specific paces or the pings and chimes of your GPS watch and Strava account as a new runner. There will plenty of time for fast, specific running later in your career, but it has it’s place. Learn to run easy by perceived effort and most importantly: enjoy it!

  1. What shoes should I wear ?

I’m not going to get into the scientific validity of “corrective features” in running shoes, or lack thereof, ain’t nobody got time fo that! Go to your local running store, try on as many shoes as you can, and choose what feels comfortable to you. Don’t let anyone sell you a shoe or insert because they say you’re an “overpronator”.  We ALL pronate to some degree, it’s natural movement and it’s part of the body’s amazing shock absorption process. It’s best to leave the medical diagnosis to MDs and PTs, not to a retail sales associate. When choosing a shoe, I personally like to keep a finger nail’s width of space between my longest toe and the front of the shoe, but that’s my preference. Choose a shoe that feels good to you, however it fits.

  1. Is my form ok? What about foot strike?

Please put down “Born To Run” and forget about footstrike. Our bodies self select what works best for us in that regard and altering it in an unnatural way can result in injury. What you should be more concerned about is your overall form and posture. Follow my tips on form here and remember that with practice, patience and awareness you will start to have better form, but it takes time, and continual work.

  1. What should I eat or drink during my run?

Practice! Practice, practice, practice. The gut is a trainable organ, so you must experiment and practice with eating and drinking on the run to train it. Just keep in mind, no matter how much you try, certain things will not agree with certain people. I have plenty of friends and athletes who can eat PBJ on the run, but if I do that, it will ruin my entire day. Finding out what works for you on the run takes a fair amount of trial and error and possibly one or two lost socks, but it’s essential in your success, especially if you plan on running races that are marathon distance or greater.

  1. What should I eat after my run?

We burn roughly 100 calories (give or take) per mile depending on weight, speed, age, and sex. Now, if our initial goal is weight loss, we may not want to replace all of those calories, but we do want to give our bodies adequate nutrients to repair the damage we’ve done. As training volume and hard workouts increase, we want to aim to replace the glycogen we deplete and aid the muscles in the repair and recovery process. I’m not going to get deep into sports nutrition in this post, but a good rule of thumb is to eat something heavy in carbohydrate within 30 minutes of your run and to eat a balanced meal (protein, fats, and carbs) within 2 hours of finishing. Put good in, get good out. 

  1. What if I miss a day?

Don’t sweat it! These things happen. A missed day now and then is often a blessing in disguise as it gives your body a chance to do a little extra recovering and healing. Where you get into trouble is when you start letting this become a habit: you skip a week because you were on vacation, and then two days when you get back because work was crazy, and the following week you slept in twice… Eventually you can’t maintain the volume planned in your training and you’re forced to adjust your goals.  Becoming a better runner involves a ton of consistency and zero excuses.

Also, keep in mind that training for the marathon distance and above takes a considerable amount of dedication as well as the sacrifice of many social pleasures (I think Seb Coe said that). You need to be honest with yourself when you choose to take on the challenge. There’s nothing wrong with training for Half Marathons or 5Ks! 

  1. How can I get faster?

Patience. The whole first year of running should be mainly easy running with some hills and possibly fartlek. With time and consistency you will naturally become more efficient, stronger, and better at processing oxygen, resulting in faster easy days and many PRs. Be patient, be consistent, and enjoy the run! The rest will come.

 

Do you have questions we didn’t answer here? Feel free to shoot me an email at: upperleftdt@gmail.com